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  • TV Antennas

    by Published on 02-21-2017 08:05 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. TV Antennas
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    This antenna was an extension of an idea I had back in 2002, and had an article published about the precursor antenna in Popular Communications, in January 2003: "Phil's Easy Way To Improve Your UHF TV Reception."

    The next article published shows this antenna completely as I still use it today. This article was published in Popular Communications, February 2013, pp 10-16 ...
    by Published on 02-19-2017 11:34 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Cell Phones,
    3. TV Antennas,
    4. Satellite
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    First, a bit of quick education. When you're talking about digital signals like over-the-air TV, satellite or cellular, it doesn't matter how much signal you have as long as it's enough. It's like, if your friend is talking to you, it doesn't matter how loud he or she speaks, as long as you can understand what's being said. If you're in a noisy room you'll have to talk ...
    by Published on 02-17-2017 04:17 PM
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    2. TV Antennas
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    Trust me this is the last thing you need to worry about. Even if you are in Death Valley where temps get up to 130 now and again, you're not going to find your antenna in a puddle. Antennas are made of aluminum and have a melting point just north of 1,200 degrees. Nothing you do is going to melt that antenna ...
    by Published on 02-16-2017 11:37 AM
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    2. TV Antennas
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    I don't blame people for asking questions. I don't even blame them for asking dumb questions. After all, that's how we learn. No one, myself included, was born knowing everything there is to know about antennas or anything else. I had the help of some very patient people to get me to the point I'm at now.

    ...
    by Published on 02-15-2017 03:32 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. TV Antennas,
    3. Satellite
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    While taps, diplexers, splitters, and combiners look alike
    and serve a similar function, there are significant differences between these four devices. How will you know which one you need for your installation?

    Taps, splitters, combiners, and diplexers all accept your TV signal before distributing that signal to multiple receivers. Each one of these devices does this task a bit differently, however. This means you have to determine whether you need a tap, ...
    by Published on 02-15-2017 02:39 PM
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    2. TV Antennas
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    I was given an antenna by a family member who didn't want it any longer: It is the RCA, ANT 140. The label said: Thomson Consumer Electronics, Deptford NJ 08096-2088. I don't know who the real manufacturer was, but it was made in China.

    Looking on the Internet I found:
    THOMSON Consumer Electronics Inc./RCA
    10330 N Meridian St.
    Indianapolis, IN 46290-1024
    P: 317-587-3000
    F: 317-587-6765

    I don't know if they are one and the same company who designed this small amplified indoor TV-FM antenna. My guess is that it was Thomson that designed and had it manufactured. ...
    by Published on 02-14-2017 03:36 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. TV Antennas,
    3. Satellite


    In Wrong Tool/Right Tool we'll show you the tools you should be using when working on antenna or satellite installations.


    WRONG TOOL: Buck Knife.



    Even in an emergency, don't be tempted to strip a cable using a knife. You'll probably get the worst-case scenario: a cable that works pretty well when you are done with it but gets flaky later on.

    Why? If you are using copper-coated steel, stripping a cable with a knife will probably scratch the center conductor making it almost useless if there's the slightest bend. You'll probably also damage the outer sheath of the cable, the dielectric, and cut too much off the outer shielding cable. It's a bad deal for all involved. Sure, it makes you look all macho to shave a cable with a pocket knife and pull the dielectric off with your teeth, but it's a real bummer when that cable doesn't work.

    RIGHT TOOL: Cable prep tool



    Coaxial cable should always be prepped with a proper cable stripper. A stripper like this will help you trim the dielectric to the proper length, and get just the right amount of copper shield to meet up with a compression connector. This is the right way to do a coaxial cable and doing things the right way means fewer problems later on.

    Remember that today's coaxial cables have much more information going through them than ever before, and even the slightest nick or lost bit of copper can make a difference. It doesn't matter if you've been making coax cables for 50 years, it's worth getting the right tools for the job.
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