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    by Published on 04-25-2017 09:09 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. TV Antennas,
    3. Auto/Marine



    Of course you can. TV antennas work the same whether they're at home or on the road. In fact your home TV antenna will work in Canada, Mexico and most Caribbean nations too. There may be some issues with importing US electronic equipment into those other countries, but that's the subject of a completely different article.

    TV antennas, as complex as they are, are not able to tell what signals they're receiving. They can't tell a digital one from an analog one, they can't tell a US one from a Canadian one and they certainly can't tell a Nebraska signal from a Washington signal.

    Most smaller antennas will pick up UHF and VHF signals, so you're also all set there. Of course, smaller antennas have a more limited range so you may or may not be able to get those distant signals if you're out in the great outdoors, but if you're traveling to a local RV park, why not bring an antenna with you for the best possible TV experience?

    The best antennas for traveling, especially if part of your flight is on a plane, are our HD-Blade flat antennas. They weigh practically nothing, fit in most luggage, and work great practically anywhere. They're also very durable, with almost nothing to break. They fit in your luggage so easily that you'll probably want to just leave one there.

    Of course, you could bring an even larger antenna, that's up to you. I can't imagine anyone traveling with a large roof-mounted antenna, but hey, if you're packing up the RV, I guess why not. It's your TV... watch it your way.
    by Published on 04-16-2017 03:00 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Auto/Marine,
    3. Satellite



    It's, like, satellite TV.

    TVRO stands for "television, receive only." Right there, the way they worded it you know someone with a military background made that up. TVRO is a term that applies to commercial satellite dishes that might otherwise be mistaken for something else. TVRO dishes don't do radar, they don't connect to the internet, they don't communicate with airplanes. They get satellite TV. That's it.

    And now you're wondering why that is really some sort of consideration. Obviously at home it isn't because if there's a dish on your roof, of course it's getting satellite TV. But take the example of marine satellite dishes. Your basic marine satellite dish looks like what you see above. It's a white gumdrop that's somewhere between 20" and 100" in diameter. Yes, they really do vary that much. A large vessel could have several of them, all doing different things. So, at some point I guess you get tired of saying "not-radar, not-navigation, just-satellite-TV" and you start saying TVRO.

    TVRO marine dishes are these amazing little feats of technology that should not work. If you think about it, the slightest bump on your roof-mounted dish sets it off aim and here's a dish that moves across the ocean and bobbles left and right and up and down and it's pretty amazing that they can keep track of it.

    I recently visited Intellian's US tech facility and they showed me the powerful hardware that controls these dishes. They do actually receive GPS coordinates so they can aim themselves roughly, and once they have a rough aim they're constantly adjusting themselves to keep the strongest possible signal. It's a combination of extremely complex logic and taking advantage of the way that satellite signals actually work. It's amazing.

    If you're in the market for a satellite system for your boat, whether it's large or small, I encourage you to call the experts at Signal Connect, our commercial and installation arm. We can give you the best advice and find a system that works for you no matter where in the world you are. Just give us a call at 866.726.4182!
    by Published on 04-07-2017 08:25 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Auto/Marine,
    3. Satellite
    Article Preview



    In just a few short years, DIRECTV's Genie system has gone from "latest and greatest" to "this is what everyone gets." If you're a new DIRECTV customer, you get a Genie, period. (At least residential customers. Commercial customers get something else.) So if you have DIRECTV at home you've gotten used to recording five things at once, having the interactive ...
    by Published on 04-06-2017 02:22 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Auto/Marine
    Article Preview



    You see this all the time with marine antennas, but you'll also see it with some TV and cellular antennas designed for home use. It's not just to keep the antenna pretty, there's actually a good reason.

    In the case of marine antennas, fiberglass is usually the covering of choice. It's ...
    by Published on 03-30-2017 12:10 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Auto/Marine



    If it's something you care about... pretty important.

    It may not look like there's a lot of difference between the marine products sold at Solid Signal and other products sold for land use. For example, this radio:



    probably wouldn't look out of place in a car, at least if you overlooked the white color. Yet, it's designed specifically for marine use. That means it uses the right connectors and the right voltage for marine connections. It's water-resistant (including the speakers) meaning it's going to survive at least casually getting wet. Any component that's out in the open is rated to survive against the highly corrosive salt air. It's just a better device for putting in your boat, which is of course the whole point.

    If you care about a piece of electronic gear, it should be marine rated if it lives on your boat. If you use "plain old" electronics, they will fail faster and probably when you need them the most. That's the whole point.

    Luckily, almost anything you want to put on your vessel is going to come in some sort of marine rated version. That includes entertainment gear, too -- satellite, TV antenna and cellular booster equipment is all available in marine-optimized packages. If something isn't marine rated and you want to keep it safe, it will have to go deep in the cabin, as waterproof as possible, and protected with a surge protector so that it won't short out if it gets wet.

    The fact is, there is a difference, and it's important especially for emergency gear. If you're interested in getting the best marine-rated electronics, check out the selection at Solid Signal now!
    by Published on 03-21-2017 11:40 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Auto/Marine
    Article Preview



    Spring is coming and youíre getting ready to launch your boat for another season. This is the perfect time to get satellite TV in your yacht or service vessel.

    This time of the year means getting your boat ready to launch. This means checking the vesselís electrical and mechanical systems as well as a safety check for life jackets and first aid kits. This is also a great time to make sure all ...
    by Published on 03-16-2017 12:50 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Auto/Marine,
    3. Satellite



    A marine dish for DIRECTV HD is big. It's about a foot wider than a dish for DISH Network or DIRECTV SD. We're talking about something that's really too big for anything but a larger craft. Why is that?

    DIRECTV's HD broadcasts are in a frequency range used by no one else in North America. This "Ka Band" is licensed exclusively to DIRECTV, and it was a big deal when they first did it over a decade ago. This allows DIRECTV almost unlimited expansion into HD and 4K, giving the ability to broadcast thousands of HD channels with no concern for interference.

    In contrast, DISH uses the same Ku Band that everyone else uses and as a result they sometimes deal with issues of channel capacity, which mean fewer channels in fewer markets. But there is an upside to being in that crowded range where all other satellite broadcasts live: it's a better place to be in a lot of ways.

    The Ku band is less susceptible to interference from clouds and rain so it's possible to get a stronger signal with a smaller dish. In order to get a strong signal with DIRECTV's Ka Band even on a rainy day, a bigger dish is needed. So, DIRECTV dishes tend to be bigger, simple as that.

    With DIRECTV phasing out standard definition service in 2019, manufacturers like Intellian, KVH and Seatel are working hard on ultra-sensitive electronics and low-noise amplifiers that may allow people to use those smaller domes and still get HD service. It's a race with the clock to be sure,
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